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Constraints to SME Financing

May 18, 2015
Though the constraints are many, limited access to finance and the cost of credit are typically identified in SME surveys among the most important ones. (...) As a result of these constraints, SMEs (...) rely more heavily on informal sources of finance, such as borrowing from family and friends or from unregulated moneylenders. One important element behind the SME "credit gap" is the information asymmetries between external creditors and SMEs. (...) However, it needs to be noted and recognized that there are several other micro and macro factors that also inhibit adequate external financing for SMEs (...). The most relevant of these other factors are described briefly below. Some of the obstacles to SME financing are associated precisely to their own nature as smaller companies. This includes factors such as lack of critical economic size, and the somewhat informal and generally less sophisticated management of SMEs. In the first case, relatively small average loan volumes may not warrant the costs of targeted credit risk analyses that are required in the absence of more standardized and comprehensive credit data. As for the second factor, from the perspective of lenders most SMEs lack the understanding of developing a coherent and acceptable business plan to underpin their credit/loan application, and if a loan is granted they often fail to provide robust updates or progress reports on the unfolding of the business plan. Some macro factors that act as poor business enablers include lack of adequate legal and enforcement protections for creditors, like bankruptcy laws that favor debtors' rights in a non-equitable manner vis-à-vis creditor rights, weak definition of property rights that hinder pledging property as collateral, and in general weak contract enforcement. Problems like these tend to be more acute in developing countries. Other macro factors that recently are believed to have affected the ability and/or willingness of creditors, in particular from banks, to engage with SMEs include the restructuring of many national banking sectors after the financial crises that emerged in 2008, and the bank solvency regulations in the Basel II and more recently the Basel III Capital Accords. On the latter, several studies have found that the Basel III risk weighting approach to calculate capital requirements, which is basically the same as that of Basel II, encourages portfolio concentrations in assets like government bonds, mortgages and lending between banks. It also favors lending to companies with an external credit rating of A or above, practically all of which are large companies. When these methodologies to calculate capital requirements were introduced in the early 2000s with the Basel II Capital Accord, many banks started withdrawing from SME lending and reduced overdrafts, thus driving SMEs to alternative financing like factoring, securitized receivables, leasing and trade credit. * If you find value in this excerpt, you may enjoy reading the full publication, Facilitating SME Financing
through Improved Credit Reporting

from the Report of the International
Committee on Credit Reporting chaired by the World Bank.

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